The Mind’s Self Defense

The clinical method for treating psychopathology is called psychoanalysis, personality organization, aspects, and dynamics of personality are the guiding principles. Laid out by the father of psychology Dr. Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century, psychoanalysis has since gone through numerous changes, evolution and catalytic processes. The last third of the 20th century, long after the Freud’s death, is when psychoanalysis truly came forward full-fledged and really embodied its true potential.
Freud had undergone a tectonic shift from the study of the brain to the study of the mind. The brain represented a more biological aspect whereas the mind was more to do with the psychological aspect of things. His study laid emphasis on the recognition of childhood events that could influence the mental machinery of all adults. His research in genetics and grassroots of psychological studies gave his studies a unique interpretation.
Basically, it is a type of therapy that aims to release the residual or emotions that are held back. We could also conclude that the aim of psychoanalysis is to bring those memories that are deep inside the unconscious or subconscious brain. There are a lot of methods through which this can be accomplished, one of the most prominent ones is to talk to a person about the instrumental questions, about things that matter, and things that matter, diving into the complexities that lie beneath the simplistic surface.
In his expansive and elaborate studies, Freud found that there are three sections of the mind that are in constant battle with each other. When the battle is too overwhelming for a person, their ego comes into play in the form of defense mechanisms.
Repression: an unconscious mechanism in which the ego pushes disturbing out of consciousness.

Denial: the ego denies upsetting experiences from the conscious mind, causing the individual to refuse to acknowledge or believe what is happening.

Projection: the ego’s attempt to solve discomfort by attributing the individual’s unacceptable thoughts, and motives to another person.
Displacement: a mechanism by which the individual can satisfy an impulse by acting on a substitute person in a socially unacceptable way.

Regression: a defense mechanism in which the individual moves backward in development in order to cope with stress (e.g., an overwhelmed adult acting like a child).

Sublimation: this defense mechanism involves satisfying an impulse by acting on a substitute but in a socially acceptable way.
There are many more layers to psychoanalysis, but to get a fair idea of the human mind and psychoanalysis, come on over and read on.


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